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20121124
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-span. but what soldiers now placed on century duty on the road in and out of boston and on guard outside the homes, officials and with british artillery now aimed at the town house of the general court, it is easy to understand why many boston residents felt threatened by the occupation. many he is how some soldiers try to stir up racial tensions in their town. not everyone in boston is white. for instance, with an -- within a month and there are rival, three british officers had been discovered encouraging some african american slaves in boston to attack their white masters. one of the stock officers assured these black bostonians that the soldiers were there to procure their freedom and that with their help and assistance, we should be able to drive all the liberty bowl is to the devil. while that slaves he talked to ignore these lies, the british army was not there to free the slaves. several white residents marched complaints -- loged complaints. >> colonial life in british occupied boston, saturday night at 8:00 eastern, part of a holiday weekend now through monday morning on c-span
. and the strange way of her family, she was sent to a fancy finishing school in boston. were she was taught to dance well and to become a witty conversationalist and a striking young woman. in 1864, she had her debut in new york. and she came back here a few years later. nothing could outdo the flurry of excitement when she returned to new york in the fall of 1860. the city shimmered with news that the prince of wales was coming to visit. in his honor, a group of leading citizens was organizing a ball. society than was very excited. excited couples who had paid $10 apiece arrive at the academy of music. women curl their hair and they had special nods to acquaintances and friends. precisely at 10:00 p.m., they prayed and sang god save the queen and the slight friends stepped into the room. for two hours, nearly 3000 of new york's finest citizens rushed like schoolgirls to meet him. in a mad crush, the wooden floor collapsed. the band played furiously. the guests rushed to follow and they piled their plates with lobster salad, and filled their glasses with champagne. at 2:00 a.m., the dance f
in colonial boston, you can imagine what that might have been like. when i was writing about franklinite realize a large part of the story was going to consist of franklin growing old because he became america's emissary to france during the american revolution at the age of 70. i started writing about franklin when i was around 40 and i really wondered whether i was going to be able to understand what it was like to grow old and infirm which was a large part of a franklin story. partly for this reason, i decided, and this is carried through in my other book, i decided to tell my stories, i try to relate the lives of my characters as much as possible through the perceptions, the words of people who knew them. my books tend to have more eyewitness stuff than some others. if i have a choice between writing a scene in my own words and writing a scene in the words of somebody who was mayor, i will tend toward the person who was there. that conveys a certain authenticity and it relieves me of the burden really of sort of providing the authority because the question anyone should have is how d
, sunday night at 8:00 p.m. >> with soldiers placed on a century duty on the road in and out of a boston, and on guard outside the homes of officials, and of british artillery now aimed at the townhouse, of the general court, it is easy to understand why many of felt threatened. of course not everyone in boston is white. within a month of their arrival in 1768, three british officers, probably drunk had been discovered encouraging african american slaves to attack their white masters. one of the drug officers assured the officersbostonians that the soldiers were coming to a procurer their freedoms. while of the slaves sensibly ignored these lies, the british army is not in a boston to free the slaves. several white residents launched complaints to captain wilson and is probably drug friends, engaging in a dangerous rebellion. >> tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern, part of the holiday weekend now through monday morning on c-span 3, american history tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: paul rothstein is a georgetown university law professor. talking about seceding from the united states.
. >> well, my family came down from boston. my in-laws now. and that is a group of all of us. and way, way, way in the back is the parade. this is my first time spending thanksgiving in new york city with the parade, and i didn't realize how all the streets are closed off. i'm like oh, we'll just walk up to it. we saw papa smurf. we saw spiderman. so the kids were happy. >> this is your first married holiday. like me this is my first married holiday. but because of work, we didn't have time to travel so. we volunteered for an organization in new york that provides home and shelter to lgbt youth. that is the before picture of the yams. that is the after. >> who was cooking? >> this was a combination. if you saw that shot, we had patrick, who was taking everybody to the gun show. [ laughter ] >> two tickets, right? >> but ally sheedy was in that picture. the actress and her daughter. it was a new oven. >> it's true. sometimes they just don't work way they should. it's a good excuse. >> blame the appliances. >> if you have a stash of marshmallows, you cover up the burns. >> good tips. we'll b
takes command of the continental army he goes to boston and sees black men with guns and knows he's not going to build a self this to his brethren south carolina and georgia. he stops that. eventually he changed his mind when he needed more bodies and his army peer we always have to weigh these things. they are not black-and-white issues. he was a man of his time, part of the society utterly dependent on slavery and knew he was not going to change the minds of his fellow slaveholders. we point to these founding fathers and genuinely with admiration. but this was clearly where they did not see the great conflagration that was coming. how still out c. davis is the author on "in depth" on booktv on c-span 2. a better after we have with some questions have been preapproval shape as now. we have an hour and half program. we'll be right back. >> host: and we're back live with kenneth davis, author and historian in new york city. this is booktv on c-span 2. mr. davis come you say when it comes to your career, your writing career that she give a lot of credit to join davis. who is that? >
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6